Tag Archives: telogen effluvium

Hair Loss experienced by PKU patients returning to the low-protein diet is temporary

There is some good news to report back to my blog followers: hair loss related to a return to the low-protein diet is temporary.

Earlier this month, I published a post titled Losing it: Both literally and figuratively over PKU and hair loss and during that post, I mentioned that PKU patients experiencing significant hair loss after returning to the PKU diet may want to see a specialist for insight behind the cause. I decided to take my own advice and scheduled an appointment with a dermatologist (I was referred to a dermatologist because of the profession’s specialization in matters related to the epidermis, or skin).

The dermatologist diagnosed my hair loss as telogen effluvium, or excessive hair shedding. She proceeded to describe to me a common cause of telogen effluvium where a major life stressor—say a car accident, pregnancy or even a crash diet—causes the hair follicles to stop growing. It is very similar to what was described to my clinic by another dietician. The dermatologist then sketched out a rough timeline on the paper covering the examination table and here below, I have tried to recreate it.

PKU Hair Loss Telogen effluvium

Click image to enlarge.

To summarize this graphic, the progression of my own hair loss coincided with what is commonly seen in cases of telogen effluvium. The initial shock to the system was my sudden return to the low-protein diet, and as a result, my hair follicles entered a resting phase. Generally speaking, the hair loss becomes noticeable about one to two months after the initial stressor when the new hair growth pushes out the resting hair.

Thankfully, this means that PKU patients who experience hair loss after returning to the PKU diet will eventually grow back their hair. In my case, I can already see “baby hairs” peeking through my hairline. Unfortunately, my dermatologist estimates it will take approximately two years before those baby hairs are long enough to tie back into a ponytail. In the meantime, I’ll embrace the heck out of some hairspray! 🙂

–NM

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