Tag Archives: Low-protein cooking

PKU-Friendly Sweet Potato Casserole with Bananas

PKU-Friendly Sweet Potato Casserole

This recipe is an adaptation of one I recently saw demonstrated on one of our local weekend morning news shows. Using roasted bananas provides a natural sweetener and also adds fiber and potassium into the PKU diet. With a few slight changes to the ingredients and some gram-scale measurements, I was also able to figure out the amount of phe per serving. In addition to being an awesomely flavorful comfort food perfect for the approaching holiday season, this recipe yields enough servings to feed the entire family. Here’s how you make it:

Ingredients

  • 6 pounds (about 6) sweet potatoes
    (approximately 1,480 grams when measured after being mashed)
  • 2 ripe bananas, skins on
  • 1/2 stick unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup Michele’s Butter Pecan Syrup
  • 2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups of miniature marshmallows
  • 2 tablespoons of brown sugar

Directions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
Peel the sweet potatoes, cut into large chunks and boil until soft (try piercing with a fork to determine when done).

PKU-Friendly Sweet Potato Casserole

Meanwhile, roast the bananas, with the skins on, for 15 minutes. Transfer potatoes to a large mixing bowl and pulse with a hand mixer until whipped. When the bananas are cool enough to handle, slice the end opposite from the stem with a sharp knife.

PKU-Friendly Sweet Potato Casserole

While holding the bananas from the stem, squeeze the contents into the bowl of mashed sweet potatoes. Add the butter and maple syrup, mix until smooth. Add the cinnamon, pumpkin pie spice and salt; mix to combine. Transfer to a shallow baking pan and smooth out the surface with a spatula. Top potato-banana mixture with marshmallows and evenly sprinkled brown sugar. Bake at 300 degrees F until heated through, about 20 minutes. For the last minute or so of baking time, switch your oven to broil for that campfire roasted marshmallow consistency.

Couple of things to note: I selected Michele’s Butter Pecan Syrup for two reasons: 1.) it is completely phe free and 2.) I really wanted to add butter-roasted pecans, but as we all know, that’s a PKU no-no. If you decide to use a different brand of syrup, be sure to adjust the phe as needed. Also, feel free to have fun with the toppings. Instead of marshmallows, you may want to try raisins for a healthier option.

Yield: 8 servings
Phe: Entire recipe = 1,340 mg; 167.5 mg/serving
Protein: 3.2 gm per serving
Exchanges: 11.2 per serving
Calories: Entire recipe = 2,616 calories; 327 calories/serving
Fat: 6.2 gm per serving

* Simply divide the casserole into 10 servings for fewer mg of phe/serving.

–NM

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Creating a kitchen tablet holder for PKU recipes

According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, a third of American adults ages 18 and older own a tablet computer like an iPad, Samsung Galaxy Tab, Google Nexus or Kindle Fire. That’s almost twice as many from one year ago. Chances are, folks in the PKU community are no exception to this growing trend. In fact, I tend to use my own tablet for referring to recipes as opposed to the traditional printed cookbooks. That’s where the inspiration for this DIY project came from. Here’s how you can also make your own kitchen tablet holder for PKU recipes.

DIY kitchen tablet holder for PKU recipes

First, I found an old cutting board from a thrift store for $1.50. Then I purchased a Scrabble tile holder from a local antiques and collectables store for $5. For a little embellishment, I found unfinished wooden letters from JoAnn Fabrics (although you could also find something similar at other hobby stores such as Michaels and Hobby Lobby). Lastly, you need a wooden wedge of sorts. My brother-in-law, who is handy with a power saw, made mine, but a child’s wooden block would also work. unfinished pics-croppedUse wood glue to assemble the pieces, allow to dry over night, and cover with your favorite paint color. I decided to use a slightly darker shade for the “Create” letters so that it would pop a little.

DIY kitchen tablet holder for PKU recipesEnjoy!

–NM

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Garlic Roasted Eggplant Spaghetti Sauce

During this long, President’s Day weekend, I was looking for ways to shake-up the spaghetti and marinara I seemed to be eating all the time. I wanted to try something new and eggplant is something I did not have a lot of experience cooking. If you have never cooked with eggplant, try not to get freaked out by the brown seeds. Those are normal. And it is important to extract as much liquid from the eggplant when you press it between the paper towels. This will provide you with the best roasted flavor and texture as possible.

Garlic Roasted Eggplant Spaghetti Sauce, Low-protein, PKU Recipes, PKU Cooking, Phenylketonuria

Low-protein Garlic Roasted Eggplant Spaghetti Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 1 med-large eggplant, unpeeled and cut into large chunks
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 cup Classico Traditional Sweet Basil pasta sauce

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 500 degrees.
  • Place eggplant in colander, sprinkle evenly with salt and let stand for approximately 2 hours.
  • Rinse salt from eggplant and press firmly between triple-layered paper towels.
  • Toss eggplant and olive oil together in a large mixing bowl.
  • Sprinkle garlic powder on top of eggplant/olive oil mixture, making sure to coat evenly.
  • Spread in single layer on large baking sheet.
  • Roast for approximately 30 minutes or until tender and brown. Stir every 10 minutes.
  • Allow eggplant to cool when done.
  • Separate into two, ½ cup servings (It is important to measure the eggplant after it is cooked because the size and weight of eggplant changes dramatically after it has been cooked).
  • Set one serving aside for sauce.
  • Store the second serving in the refrigerator until ready to eat at a later time.
  • Toss remaining ½ cup of roasted eggplant and 1 cup of pasta sauce into a sauce pan on medium-high heat.
  • Once sauce mixture is warm, serve on top of low-protein Aproten Spaghetti noodles.

Yield: 1 serving, plus an additional serving of roasted eggplant for later
Phe: 129 mg (sauce & eggplant only; add additional phe for low-protein pasta)

My oven seemed to run a little hot for 500 degrees and I did not really need to roast my eggplant for a full 30 minutes. In fact, I would venture to say that mine turned out slightly over cooked; however, I will get better with practice. Just watch the eggplant closely as you roast it on the baking sheet and if you feel that it is getting heavily browned, then remove it from the oven. Whenever you prepare to eat the left-over portion of the roasted eggplant, simply repeat the last two steps in the directions listed above. Depending on your preference, you may also want to top the dish with Daiya Mozzarella Shreds and serve with low-protein garlic bread.

–NM

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